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7th International Conference on Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine, will be organized around the theme “Transforming Repairs into Regeneration”

Regenerative Medicine 2017 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Regenerative Medicine 2017

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Tissue engineering is emerging as a significant potential alternative or complementary solution, whereby tissue and organ failure is addressed by implanting natural, synthetic, or semisynthetic tissue and organ mimics that are fully functional from the start, or that grow into the required functionality. Initial efforts have focused on skin equivalents for treating burns, but an increasing number of tissue types are now being engineered, as well as biomaterials and scaffolds used as delivery systems. A variety of approaches are used to coax differentiated or undifferentiated cells, such as stem cells, into the desired cell type. Notable results include tissue-engineered bone, blood vessels, liver, muscle, and even nerve conduits. As a result of the medical and market potential, there is significant academic and corporate interest in this technology.

  • Track 1-1Histopathology
  • Track 1-2Tissue biomarkers
  • Track 1-3Tissue graft tolerance
  • Track 1-4Photodynamic therapy
  • Track 1-5Tissue mechanics & mechanobiology

In biology, regeneration is the process of renewal, restoration, and growth that makes genomes, cells, organisms, and ecosystems resilient to natural fluctuations or events that cause disturbance or damage. Every species is capable of regeneration, from bacteria to humans. Regeneration can either be complete where the new tissue is the same as the lost tissue, or incomplete where after the necrotic tissue comes fibrosis. At its most elementary level, regeneration is mediated by the molecular processes of gene regulation. Regeneration in biology, however, mainly refers to the morphogenic processes that characterize the phenotypic plasticity of traits allowing multi-cellular organisms to repair and maintain the integrity of their physiological and morphological states. Above the genetic level, regeneration is fundamentally regulated by asexual cellular processes. Regeneration is different from reproduction. For example, hydra perform regeneration but reproduce by the method of budding.

  • Track 2-1Vascular tissue engineering and regeneration
  • Track 2-2Organ transplantation and its new techniques
  • Track 2-3Advanced developments in artificial organ system
  • Track 2-4Regenerative-medicine approach
  • Track 2-5Challenges in tissue engineering
  • Track 2-6Soft tissues

Stem cells are undifferentiated cells, that can differentiate into specialized cells and can divide to produce more stem cells. They are found in multicellular organisms. In mammals, there are two broad types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, which are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and adult stem cells, which are found in various tissues. In adult organisms, stem cells and progenitor cells act as a repair system for the body, replenishing adult tissues. In a developing embryo, stem cells can differentiate into all the specialized cells—ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm - but also maintain the normal turnover of regenerative organs, such as blood, skin, or intestinal tissues.

  • Track 3-1Craniofacial tissue engineering
  • Track 3-2Breakthrough in cell culture technology for tissue engineering
  • Track 3-3Cell-based tissue engineering and cell signaling
  • Track 3-4In-situ tissue regeneration
  • Track 3-5Adipose-derived stem cells for regenerative medicine
  • Track 3-6Biomaterials design and technology
  • Track 3-7Nanostructures and nanomaterials

Scaffolds are one of the three most important elements constituting the basic concept of regenerative medicine, and are included in the core technology of regenerative medicine. Every day thousands of surgical procedures are performed to replace or repair tissue that has been damaged through disease or trauma. The developing field of tissue engineering (TE) aims to regenerate damaged tissues by combining cells from the body with highly porous scaffold biomaterials, which act as templates for tissue regeneration, to guide the growth of new tissue. Scaffolds has a prominent role in tissue regeneration the designs, fabrication, 3D models, surface ligands and molecular architecture, nanoparticle-cell interactions and porous of the scaffolds are been used in the field in attempts to regenerate different tissues and organs in the body. The world stem cell market was approximately 2.715 billion dollars in 2010, and with a growth rate of 16.8% annually, a market of 6.877 billion dollars will be formed in 2016. From 2017, the expected annual growth rate is 10.6%, which would expand the market to 11.38 billion dollars by 2021. Several scaffolds workshops, bioreactors workshops are being conducted globally.

  • Track 4-1Scaffold designs
  • Track 4-2Fabrication of scaffolds
  • Track 4-3Biodegradable nanofiber scaffolds
  • Track 4-43D scaffolds and models
  • Track 4-5Surface ligands and molecular architecture
  • Track 4-6Nanoparticle-cell interactions
  • Track 4-7Porous scaffolds

Tissue repair and regeneration following injury or disease are often thought to recapitulate embryonic development by using similar molecular and cellular pathways. In addition, many embryonic tissues, such as the spinal cord, heart, and limbs, have some regenerative potential and may utilize mechanisms that can be exogenously activated in adult tissues. For example, BMP signaling regulates nervous system development, and SMAD reactivation plays a critical role in adult nerve regeneration and repair in animal models of spinal cord injury. While similar molecular pathways are utilized during embryogenesis and adult tissue regeneration, recent reports suggest the mechanisms by which these developmental programs are reactivated and maintained may vary in adult tissues. Adult fish and amphibians have a remarkable capacity for tissue regeneration, while mammals have a limited regenerative capacity.

  • Track 5-1Prosthodontics and endodontics
  • Track 5-2Peridontal therapy/surgery
  • Track 5-3Effects of guided tissue regeneration
  • Track 5-4Advancements in biomedical and tissue engineering techniques
  • Track 5-5Recent innovations in regenerative and tissue engineering
  • Track 5-6Advanced stem cell therapies in tissue engineering

Regenerative medicine is an emerging branch of medicine with the goal of restoring organ and/or tissue function for patients with serious injuries or chronic disease in which the bodies own responses are not sufficient enough to restore functional tissue. New and current Regenerative Medicines can use stem cells to create living and functional tissues to regenerate and repair tissue and organs in the body that are damaged due to age, disease and congenital defects. Stem cells have the power to go to these damaged areas and regenerate new cells and tissues by performing a repair and a renewal process, restoring functionality. Regenerative medicine has the potential to provide a cure to failing or impaired tissues.

Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent, meaning they are able to grow (i.e. differentiate) into all derivatives of the three primary germ layers: ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm. In other words, they can develop into each of the more than 200 cell types of the adult body as long as they are specified to do so. Embryonic stem cells are distinguished by two distinctive properties: their pluripotency, and their ability to replicate indefinitely. ES cells are pluripotent, that is, they are able to differentiate into all derivatives of the three primary germ layers: ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm. These include each of the more than 220 cell types in the adult body. Pluripotency distinguishes embryonic stem cells from adult stem cells found in adults; while embryonic stem cells can generate all cell types in the body, adult stem cells are multipotent and can produce only a limited number of cell types. Additionally, under defined conditions, embryonic stem cells are capable of propagating themselves indefinitely. This allows embryonic stem cells to be employed as useful tools for both research and regenerative medicine, because they can produce limitless numbers of themselves for continued research or clinical use.

  • Track 7-1Embryonic stem cell
  • Track 7-2Embryonic stem cell research
  • Track 7-3Pro embryonic stem cell research
  • Track 7-4Human embryonic stem cells

Cellular therapy, also called live cell therapy, cellular suspensions, glandular therapy, fresh cell therapy, siccacell therapy, embryonic cell therapy, and organotherapy - refers to various procedures in which processed tissue from animal embryos, fetuses or organs, is injected or taken orally. Products are obtained from specific organs or tissues said to correspond with the unhealthy organs or tissues of the recipient. Proponents claim that the recipient's body automatically transports the injected cells to the target organs, where they supposedly strengthen them and regenerate their structure. The organs and glands used in cell treatment include brain, pituitary, thyroid, adrenals, thymus, liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, heart, ovary, testis, and parotid. Several different types of cell or cell extract can be given simultaneously - some practitioners routinely give up to 20 or more at once.

Rejuvenation is a medical discipline focused on the practical reversal of the aging process. Rejuvenation is distinct from life extension. Life extension strategies often study the causes of aging and try to oppose those causes in order to slow aging. Rejuvenation is the reversal of aging and thus requires a different strategy, namely repair of the damage that is associated with aging or replacement of damaged tissue with new tissue. Rejuvenation can be a means of life extension, but most life extension strategies do not involve rejuvenation.

  • Track 9-1Characterization of cancer stem cells
  • Track 9-2Therapeutic implications of cancer stem cells
  • Track 9-3Reconstruction of cancer stem cells
  • Track 9-4Challenging the gaps in global cancer stem cells

Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease. In the future, this technique may allow doctors to treat a disorder by inserting a gene into a patient’s cells instead of using drugs or surgery. Researchers are testing several approaches to gene therapy, including: Replacing a mutated gene that causes disease with a healthy copy of the gene; Inactivating, or “knocking out,” a mutated gene that is functioning improperly;Introducing a new gene into the body to help fight a disease. Although gene therapy is a promising treatment option for a number of diseases (including inherited disorders, some types of cancer, and certain viral infections), the technique remains risky and is still under study to make sure that it will be safe and effective. Gene therapy is currently only being tested for the treatment of diseases that have no other cures.

Immunotherapy, also called biologic therapy, is a type of cancer treatment designed to boost the body's natural defense to fight the cancer. It uses materials either made by the body or in a laboratory to improve, target, or restore immune system function. It is not entirely clear how immunotherapy treats cancer. However, it may work in the following ways: Stopping or slowing the growth of cancer cells; Stopping cancer from spreading to other parts of the body; Helping the immune system work better at destroying cancer cells.There are several types of immunotherapy, including monoclonal antibodies, non-specific immunotherapies, and cancer vaccines.

Biomaterials are being used for the healthcare applications from ancient times. But subsequent evolution has made them more versatile and has increased their utility. Biomaterials have revolutionized the areas like bioengineering and tissue engineering for the development of novel strategies to combat life threatening diseases. Together with biomaterials, stem cell technology is also being used to improve the existing healthcare facilities. These concepts and technologies are being used for the treatment of different diseases like cardiac failure, fractures, deep skin injuries, etc. Introduction of nanomaterials on the other hand is becoming a big hope for a better and an affordable healthcare.

Stem cell transplantation is a procedure that is most often recommended as a treatment option for people with leukemia, multiple myeloma, and some types of lymphoma. It may also be used to treat some genetic diseases that involve the blood. During a stem cell transplant diseased bone marrow (the spongy, fatty tissue found inside larger bones) is destroyed with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy and then replaced with highly specialized stem cells that develop into healthy bone marrow. Although this procedure used to be referred to as a bone marrow transplant, today it is more commonly called a stem cell transplant because it is stem cells in the blood that are typically being transplanted, not the actual bone marrow tissue.

  • Track 13-1Advances in stem cell transplantation
  • Track 13-2Autologous stem cell transplant
  • Track 13-3Cord blood stem cell transplant
  • Track 13-4Embryonic stem cell transplant

Stem Cell Research offers great promise for understanding basic mechanisms of human development and differentiation, as well as the hope for new treatments for diseases such as diabetes, spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and myocardial infarction. Pluripotent stem cells perpetuate themselves in culture and can differentiate into all types of specialized cells. Scientists plan to differentiate pluripotent cells into specialized cells that could be used for transplantation

Molecular and Cellular Engineering uses engineering principles to understand and construct cellular and molecular circuits with useful properties. At the molecular level, proteins can be engineered to elicit specific ligand-receptor interactions, which can then be used for the rational design of targeted drug therapies. At the cellular level, metabolic engineering can create cellular biosensors that can monitor the environment for toxins or other specific molecules. Molecular and Cellular engineering can also be used to enhance the cellular production of pharmaceuticals, the delivery of beneficial genes to a particular cell type, and the production of tissues or tissue matrices for therapeutic purposes. This area of research also promises to help the scientific community unlock the mysteries of cellular metabolism, and how alterations in metabolism can lead to a myriad of human disease processes.

  • Track 15-1Advances in cell and gene therapy
  • Track 15-2Novel methods in regenerative medicine
  • Track 15-3Molecular therapy
  • Track 15-4Dental and craniofacial regeneration
  • Track 15-5 Latest developments in stem cell research and regenerative medicine

Some parts of our bodies can repair themselves quite well after injury, but others don’t repair at all. We certainly can’t regrow a whole leg or arm, but some animals Can regrow - or regenerate - whole body parts. Regeneration means the regrowth of a damaged or missing organ part from the remaining tissue. As adults, humans can regenerate some organs, such as the liver. If part of the liver is lost by disease or injury, the liver grows back to its original size, though not its original shape. And our skin is constantly being renewed and repaired. Unfortunately many other human tissues don’t regenerate, and a goal in regenerative medicine is to find ways to kick-start tissue regeneration in the body, or to engineer replacement tissues.

  • Track 16-1Cell tracking and tissue imaging
  • Track 16-2Ethics and applications of regenerative medicine
  • Track 16-3Stem cells to the market place
  • Track 16-4Equipment for organ harvesting, transport and transplant
  • Track 16-5Tissue bio-banking

Translational science is a multidisciplinary form of science that bridges the recalcitrant gaps that sometimes exist between fundamental science and applied science, necessitating something in between to translate knowledge into applications. The term is most often used in the health sciences and refers to the translation of bench science, conducted only in a lab, to bedside clinical practice or dissemination to population-based community interventions.Translational Medicines: Translational medicine, also called translational medical science, preclinical research, evidence-based research, or disease-targeted research, area of research that aims to improve human health and longevity by determining the relevance to human disease of novel discoveries in the biological sciences.

  • Track 17-1Stem cells for tissue repair
  • Track 17-2Tissue injury and healing process
  • Track 17-3Regenerative therapeutics
  • Track 17-4 Cardiac stem cell therapy for regeneration
  • Track 17-5Functional regenerative recovery
  • Track 17-6Effects of aging on tissue repair/regeneration
  • Track 17-7Corneal regeneration & degeneration

Tissue engineering of musculoskeletal tissues, particularly bone and cartilage, is a rapidly advancing field. In bone, technology has centered on bone graft substitute materials and the development of biodegradable scaffolds. Recently, tissue engineering strategies have included cell and gene therapy. The availability of growth factors and the expanding knowledge base concerning the bone regeneration with modern techniques like recombinant signaling molecules, solid free form fabrication of scaffolds, synthetic cartilage, Electrochemical deposition, spinal fusion and ossification are new generated techniques for tissue-engineering applications. The worldwide market for bone and cartilage repairs strategies is estimated about $300 million. During the last 10/15 years, the scientific community witnessed and reported the appearance of several sources of stem cells with both osteo and chondrogenic potential. Several sessions on tissue engineering like bone tissue engineering meetings, biomaterials meetings, implants meetings, cartilage regeneration symposiums are being conducted on a large scale every year.

  • Track 18-1Bone regeneration and modern techniques
  • Track 18-2Recombinant signaling molecules
  • Track 18-3Solid free form fabrication of scaffolds
  • Track 18-4Synthetic cartilage
  • Track 18-5Electrochemical deposition
  • Track 18-6Spinal fusion and Ossification
  • Track 18-7Using stem cells to build new bones

Discovered centuries ago, regeneration is a fascinating biological phenomenon that continues to intrigue. The study of regeneration promises to inform how adult tissues heal and rebuild themselves such that this process may someday be stimulated in a clinical setting. Although mammals are limited in their ability to regenerate, closely and distantly related species alike can perform astonishing regenerative feats. Many different animals representing almost all phyla harness an innate ability to rebuild missing adult structures lost to injury. However, it is unclear which aspects of regeneration are conserved and which are unique to a given context. One aspect of regeneration that appears to be shared is the use of stem/progenitor cells to replace missing tissues.

  • Track 19-1Cell-based tissue engineering and cell signaling
  • Track 19-2In-situ tissue regeneration
  • Track 19-3Adipose-derived stem cells for regenerative medicine
  • Track 19-4Morphogenetic proteins
  • Track 19-5Spinal fusion
  • Track 19-6Intervertebral discs repair
  • Track 19-7Craniofacial tissue engineering
  • Track 19-8Breakthrough in cell culture technology for tissue engineering

There are strong pricing pressures from public healthcare payers globally as Governments try to reduce budget deficits. Regenerative medicine could potentially save public health bodies money by reducing the need for long-term care and reducing associated disorders, with potential benefits for the world economy as a whole.The global market for tissue engineering and regeneration products reached $55.9 billion in 2010, is expected to reach $59.8 billion by 2011, and will further grow to $89.7 billion by 2016 at a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.4%.  It grows to $135 billion to 2024. The contribution of the European region was 43.3% of the market in 2010, a value of $24.2 billion. The market is expected to reach $25.5 billion by 2011 and will further grow to $36.1 billion by 2016 at a CAGR of 7.2%. It grows to $65 billion to 2024.

  • Track 20-1Human Tissue Market in Asia
  • Track 20-2Regenerative medicine research in Australia
  • Track 20-3Tissue analysis products Market in USA
  • Track 20-4Stem cell analysis products Market in UK
  • Track 20-5Global market scenario of the Regnerative medicine in Asia Pacific

Leading EU nations with strong biotech sectors such as the UK and Germany are investing heavily in regenerative medicine, seeking competitive advantage in this emerging sector. The commercial regenerative medicine sector faces governance challenges that include a lack of proven business models, an immature science base and ethical controversy surrounding hESC research. The recent global downturn has exacerbated these difficulties: private finance has all but disappeared; leading companies are close to bankruptcy, and start-ups are struggling to raise funds. In the UK the government has responded by announcing £21.5M funding for the regenerative medicine industry and partners. But the present crisis extends considerably beyond RM alone, affecting much of the European biotech sector. A 2009 European Commission (EC) report showed the extent to which the global recession has impacted on access to VC finance in Europe: 75% of biopharma companies in Europe need capital within the next two years if they are to continue their current range of activities.

Stem cell biotechnology is important in regenerative medicine. It develops tools and therapeutics through modification and engineering of stem cells.